日付変更線 International Date Line
Bob Hicok, Poetry, February 2010Reposting inspired by the Sandy Hook shootings

Bob Hicok, Poetry, February 2010
Reposting inspired by the Sandy Hook shootings

Why are names (words) so mighty? Because facts, ancestry, maternity, faiths, are. Slowly, eternally, inevitably, move the souls of the earth, and names (words) are its (their) signs.
Walt Whitman, “An American Primer" (April 1904)
Jack Gilbert: “Trying to Have Something Left Over” From Collected Poems (Knopf, 2012)
Thanks to Matt Bell for posting this on his blog.

Jack Gilbert: “Trying to Have Something Left Over”
From Collected Poems (Knopf, 2012)

Thanks to Matt Bell for posting this on his blog.

ウォルト・ホイットマンの手書きの原稿Walt Whitman, Original manuscript for the “Calamus” poems  
The “Calamus” poems, first published in the third edition of Leaves of Grass (1860),  describe Whitman’s longing for the companionship and love of men. By treating the subject of love between men so boldly, these poems became some of the most infamous pieces of poetry in mid-19th century America.  Not only was the book banned in Boston and other places, it resulted in Whitman losing his job and suffering at the hands of critics.  Now, however, these poems are an essential part of American poetic history, and Whitman occupies a rightful place as one of the great visionaries of American letters.  Happy Banned Books week, Whitman!
この詩は『草の葉』第三版(一八六〇年)に収録されたが、男性同士の性愛を描写しているため、批評家に「猥褻」と思われて、ボストンで発禁本になった。ホイットマンは仕事を失って、多くの人に批判されたが、現在『草の葉』は「アメリカ自由詩の出発点」として永遠に歴史に残る。
For more photographs of the manuscript, click here.

ウォルト・ホイットマンの手書きの原稿
Walt Whitman, Original manuscript for the “Calamus” poems
 

The “Calamus” poems, first published in the third edition of Leaves of Grass (1860),  describe Whitman’s longing for the companionship and love of men. By treating the subject of love between men so boldly, these poems became some of the most infamous pieces of poetry in mid-19th century America.  Not only was the book banned in Boston and other places, it resulted in Whitman losing his job and suffering at the hands of critics.  Now, however, these poems are an essential part of American poetic history, and Whitman occupies a rightful place as one of the great visionaries of American letters.  Happy Banned Books week, Whitman!

この詩は『草の葉』第三版(一八六〇年)に収録されたが、男性同士の性愛を描写しているため、批評家に「猥褻」と思われて、ボストンで発禁本になった。ホイットマンは仕事を失って、多くの人に批判されたが、現在『草の葉』は「アメリカ自由詩の出発点」として永遠に歴史に残る。

For more photographs of the manuscript, click here.

ケイ・ライアン「ホーム・ツー・ルースト」(朗読)
Kay Ryan reading “Home to Roost”

About Ryan’s work, J. D. McClatchy has said: “Her poems are compact, exhilarating, strange affairs, like Erik Satie miniatures or Joseph Cornell boxes. She is an anomaly in today’s literary culture: as intense and elliptical as Dickinson, as buoyant and rueful as Frost” (Quoted here).

ケイ・ライアン(1945年生まれ)は2008年にアメリカの議会堂図書館に国の桂冠詩人に指定された。ライアンの詩は、ユーモアに溢れていながら、エミリー・ディキンソンのように繊細な世界を引き出す。

In celebration of National Poetry Month

Samuel Barber: “Sure on This Shining Night” & “The Crucifixion”
Cheryl Studer, Soprano

The composer Samuel Barber worked with several texts by poet and writer James Agee to produce some of the most stunningly poetic settings by any American composer.  The first of these two songs, the spectacularly lovely “Sure on This Shining Night” is surely one of the great American art songs. The other song here comes from Barber’s Hermit Songs, and is based on a translation by Howard Mumford Jones of a medieval Irish text.

In honor of National Poetry Month

ロビンソン・ジェファーズ (1887-1962) はアメリカの天才的な詩人と言われ、環境保護主義者として知られている。作品はカリフォルニアの海岸の美しさを唱えながら、社会の発展に対して批判的な立場をよく取る。Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962)
Jeffers brought enormous learning in literature, religion, philosophy, languages, myth, and sciences to his poetry. One of his favorite themes was the intense, rugged beauty of the landscape in opposition to the degraded and introverted condition of modern man. Strongly influenced by Nietzsche’s concepts of individualism, Jeffers believed that human beings had developed an insanely self-centered view of the world, and felt passionately that we must learn to have greater respect for the rest of creation. (From the Academy of American Poets' biography of Jeffers)
Carmel Point        by Robinson Jeffers   
The extraordinary patience of things! 
This beautiful place defaced with a crop of suburban houses—
How beautiful when we first beheld it,
Unbroken field of poppy and lupin walled with clean cliffs;
No intrusion but two or three horses pasturing,
Or a few milch cows rubbing their flanks on the outcrop rockheads—
Now the spoiler has come: does it care?
Not faintly. It has all time. It knows the people are a tide
That swells and in time will ebb, and all
Their works dissolve. Meanwhile the image of the pristine beauty
Lives in the very grain of the granite,
Safe as the endless ocean that climbs our cliff.—As for us:
We must uncenter our minds from ourselves;
We must unhumanize our views a little, and become confident
As the rock and ocean that we were made from.
In honor of National Poetry Month 2012

ロビンソン・ジェファーズ (1887-1962) はアメリカの天才的な詩人と言われ、環境保護主義者として知られている。作品はカリフォルニアの海岸の美しさを唱えながら、社会の発展に対して批判的な立場をよく取る。

Robinson Jeffers
(1887-1962)

Jeffers brought enormous learning in literature, religion, philosophy, languages, myth, and sciences to his poetry. One of his favorite themes was the intense, rugged beauty of the landscape in opposition to the degraded and introverted condition of modern man. Strongly influenced by Nietzsche’s concepts of individualism, Jeffers believed that human beings had developed an insanely self-centered view of the world, and felt passionately that we must learn to have greater respect for the rest of creation. (From the Academy of American Poets' biography of Jeffers)

Carmel Point   by Robinson Jeffers

The extraordinary patience of things! 
This beautiful place defaced with a crop of suburban houses—
How beautiful when we first beheld it,
Unbroken field of poppy and lupin walled with clean cliffs;
No intrusion but two or three horses pasturing,
Or a few milch cows rubbing their flanks on the outcrop rockheads—
Now the spoiler has come: does it care?
Not faintly. It has all time. It knows the people are a tide
That swells and in time will ebb, and all
Their works dissolve. Meanwhile the image of the pristine beauty
Lives in the very grain of the granite,
Safe as the endless ocean that climbs our cliff.—As for us:
We must uncenter our minds from ourselves;
We must unhumanize our views a little, and become confident
As the rock and ocean that we were made from.


In honor of National Poetry Month 2012

アメリカの現代詩の母、エミリー・ディキンソンの『植物標本集』よりディキンソンは 生前は全く無名であったが、1700篇以上残した作品はアメリカの現代詩の出発点とされている。詩を封筒や屑紙に書くことが毎日の戯れだったが、その他に 自分の庭に植物を育つことが熱心だった。『植物標本集』にそれぞれの植物を集めたので、十九世紀のアメリカの植物を研究するために、貴重な資料になってい る。
From Emily Dickinson: HerbariumIn honor of National Poetry Month 2012
Courtesy Boston Public Library and poetsorg

アメリカの現代詩の母、エミリー・ディキンソンの『植物標本集』より
ディキンソンは 生前は全く無名であったが、1700篇以上残した作品はアメリカの現代詩の出発点とされている。詩を封筒や屑紙に書くことが毎日の戯れだったが、その他に 自分の庭に植物を育つことが熱心だった。『植物標本集』にそれぞれの植物を集めたので、十九世紀のアメリカの植物を研究するために、貴重な資料になってい る。

From Emily Dickinson: Herbarium
In honor of National Poetry Month 2012

Courtesy Boston Public Library and poetsorg

アメリカの現代詩の父ワルト・ホイットマン(1819-1892)の眼鏡The glasses of Walt Whitman (1819-1892), father of modern American poetry 
Back in style?
Courtesy of poetsorg.
In honor of National Poetry Month 2012

アメリカの現代詩の父ワルト・ホイットマン(1819-1892)の眼鏡
The glasses of Walt Whitman (1819-1892), father of modern American poetry 

Back in style?

Courtesy of poetsorg.

In honor of National Poetry Month 2012

アメリカの現代詩の母、エミリー・ディキンソンの『植物標本集』よりディキンソンは生前は全く無名であったが、1700篇以上残した作品はアメリカの現代詩の出発点とされている。詩を封筒や屑紙に書くことが毎日の戯れだったが、その他に自分の庭に植物を育つことが熱心だった。『植物標本集』にそれぞれの植物を集めたので、十九世紀のアメリカの植物を研究するために、貴重な資料になっている。
From Emily Dickinson: HerbariumIn honor of National Poetry Month 2012
Courtesy Boston Public Library and poetsorg

アメリカの現代詩の母、エミリー・ディキンソンの『植物標本集』より
ディキンソンは生前は全く無名であったが、1700篇以上残した作品はアメリカの現代詩の出発点とされている。詩を封筒や屑紙に書くことが毎日の戯れだったが、その他に自分の庭に植物を育つことが熱心だった。『植物標本集』にそれぞれの植物を集めたので、十九世紀のアメリカの植物を研究するために、貴重な資料になっている。

From Emily Dickinson: Herbarium
In honor of National Poetry Month 2012

Courtesy Boston Public Library and poetsorg

Adrienne Rich reads “What Kind of Times Are These”

This film was part of the Poetry Everywhere project airing on public television. Produced by David Grubin Productions and WGBH Boston, in association with the Poetry Foundation. Filmed at the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival. For more information, visit http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/poetryeverywhere/.

Adrienne Rich (1929-2012)Today, America lost one of its most epoch-making poets.  Adrienne Rich was a feminist, humaniatrian, and deeply caring writer who helped change what it meant to be poet in the modern world while opening the possibilities of language to new, daring directions. 
From “Diving into the Wreck”  

I came to explore the wreck.
The words are purposes.
The words are maps.
I came to see the damage that was done
and the treasures that prevail.
I stroke the beam of my lamp
slowly along the flank
of something more permanent
than fish or weed

the thing I came for:
the wreck and not the story of the wreck
the thing itself and not the myth
the drowned face always staring
toward the sun
the evidence of damage
worn by salt and away into this threadbare beauty
the ribs of the disaster
curving their assertion
among the tentative haunters.

This is the place.
And I am here, the mermaid whose dark hair
streams black, the merman in his armored body.

For the complete poem, plus an audio file of Adrienne Rich reading her this poem in the year 2009, click here.

Adrienne Rich (1929-2012)
Today, America lost one of its most epoch-making poets.  Adrienne Rich was a feminist, humaniatrian, and deeply caring writer who helped change what it meant to be poet in the modern world while opening the possibilities of language to new, daring directions.

From “Diving into the Wreck” 

I came to explore the wreck.
The words are purposes.
The words are maps.
I came to see the damage that was done
and the treasures that prevail.
I stroke the beam of my lamp
slowly along the flank
of something more permanent
than fish or weed

the thing I came for:
the wreck and not the story of the wreck
the thing itself and not the myth
the drowned face always staring
toward the sun
the evidence of damage
worn by salt and away into this threadbare beauty
the ribs of the disaster
curving their assertion
among the tentative haunters.

This is the place.
And I am here, the mermaid whose dark hair
streams black, the merman in his armored body.

For the complete poem, plus an audio file of Adrienne Rich reading her this poem in the year 2009, click here.

ジャック・ケルアックの「アメリカン・ハイク」
Jack Kerouac reads “American Haiku”